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This post originally appeared on Triple Pundit: http://www.triplepundit.com/2015/05/preparing-new-realities-planners-wei... With climate uncertainty a new normal, planners from around the world are tussling with how to work with thrift so they don’t create and employ plans that may not work in an uncertain future. At last weekend’s annual American Planning Association conference in SeStreets of Bangkok Flooded in Thailandattle, for instance, planners mulled how to approach climate change and natural hazards at both the local level and worldwide. The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy sponsored the planning and climate change symposia. In some ways, adaptation and planning are interchangeable. Yet very few sessions at the conference dealt with climate adaptation and, oddly, while the event coincided on Earth Day weekend, none of the sessions or side conversations I participated in even mentioned it. Of course, planners focus generally on people and the built form. And though the environmental movement and Earth Day may be moving for humans, APA has not come to meet Earth Day.

USAID and its Climate Change Resilient Development project hosted a symposium in mid-March on Advancing Climate Resilient Development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The project, led by Engility/IRQ, was tagged as a project to watch in ND-GAIN’s 2014 Corporate Adaptation Prize competition. USAID ResilientUSAID ResilientThe Wednesday morning panel, Urban Day: Applying Technical Research and Tools in Developing Cities, focused on lessons learned from putting urban adaptation projects in place.

USAID and its Climate Change Resilient Development project hosted a symposium in mid-March on Advancing Climate Resilient Development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The project, led by Engility/IRQ, was tagged as a project to watch in ND-GAIN’s 2014 Corporate Adaptation Prize competition.

The Wednesday morning panel, Urban Day: Applying Technical Research and Tools in Developing Cities, focused on lessons learned from putting urban adaptation projects in place. A top-notch panel included John Furlow, USAID; Glen Anderson, Engility Corp.; Charles Cadwell, The Urban Institute; and Heather McGray, World Resources Institute (and lead rapporteur).

Heather issued a compelling report and to that, I offer this set of actions for all of us who consider ourselves climate-adaptation catalysts.

Momentum for Change -Apply to Receive UN Award!

Organizations, cities, industries, governments and other key players that
are taking the lead on addressing climate change adaptation in developing countries
are encouraged to nominate their projects for a prestigious United Nations
award.

http://momentum.unfccc.int/

The United Nations Climate Change secretariat is currently accepting
applications for the 2015 Momentum for Change Awards as part of wider
efforts to mobilize action and ambition as national governments work toward
adopting a new universal climate agreement this year. Winning initiatives,
called ‘Lighthouse Activities,’ highlight some of the most innovative,
scalable and replicable examples of what people are doing to address
climate change, in the hope of inspiring others to do the same.  Adaptation project applications are encouraged.

The 2015 Momentum for Change Lighthouse Activities will recognize climate
action that is already achieving real results in four key areas:

“Economic losses from disasters are out of control and can only be reduced in partnership with the private sector.”

̶ United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon

 

The United Nation’s Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, or UNISDR, and PwC, the global professional services network, launched their ambitious R!SE Initiative in the United States early this month in Boston, seeking to embed disaster risk management into investment decisions.

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