Dr. Tracy Kijewski-Correa

Dr. Tracy Kijewski-Correa

Leo E and Patti Ruth Linbeck Collegiate Chair
Associate Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences at the University of Notre Dame

Tracy Kijewski-Correa, Leo E and Patti Ruth Linbeck Collegiate Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering & Earth Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. Kijewski-Correa investigates the challenges facing civil infrastructure in both the developed and developing world. Recently, her research has focused on enhancing resilience against natural hazards.

As part of the ND GAIN team, Kijewski-Correa provides expertise on the 21st Century challenges for civil infrastructure resulting from increased urbanization and hazard vulnerability under climate change.   Her goal as a researcher in this area is to provide the needed knowledge to improve basic infrastructure in developing and disaster-impacted communities globally. Kijewski-Correa and her team have deployed advanced technologies to monitor the health and condition of structures, which allows on-going feedback on a building's performance and safety. Kijewski-Correa has also joined up with researchers from other disciplines to harness the collective knowledge and experience of stakeholders - engineers, public officials, researchers, students, and even the public at-large – in disaster risk assessment and mitigation activities. Most recently, Kijewski-Correa has applied this work in post-earthquake Haiti through the development of new sustainable housing systems that her team of students, Haitian entrepreneurs, and industry, University, and local partners are now building in-country.

Kijewski-Correa received her B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame and has received a number of university, national and international honors for her teaching and scholarship. In addition to her cutting-edge research, Kijewski-Correa advises the undergraduate NDSEED team who have designed and implemented six footbridges for isolated and vulnerable communities in three different Latin American nations.