ND-GAIN Press Releases

ND-GAIN funded by Kresge Foundation to develop U.S. Urban Adaptation Assessment

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Contact: Joyce Coffee, managing director, Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, 312-894-9028, jcoffee@nd.edu 

ND-GAIN funded by Kresge Foundation to develop U.S. Urban Adaptation Assessment

Smog in L.A.

The University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) will lead an adaptation advisory committee to determine local adaptation indicators for the United States, using these indicators to create a five-city pilot urban adaptation assessment.

Funded by the Kresge Foundation, ND-GAIN will convene an advisory committee of leading U.S. adaptation influencers, including both researchers and practitioners working on resilience. This committee will create the first set of national measures for urban adaptation and will populate the measures for five initial cities, to be identified once the study is underway.

ND-GAIN will compile and analyze the city data, producing assessments focusing on local geographies’ vulnerability to droughts, fires, floods, superstorms and other natural disasters and, uniquely, how ready they are to successfully implement adaptation solutions. The 18-month project will inform adaptation policies and investments that prepare people and their environment for a changed future. The assessments will be used by government, business and nonprofit leaders, who can apply them to decisions that improve livelihoods and save lives now and in the future.

“The ND-GAIN urban adaptation index will help to develop consensus around standards for adaptation measurement for cities across the U.S.,” said John Nordgren, the Kresge Foundation’s senior program officer for environment. “This project will help elevate critical needs on climate actions and thereby inform decisions about infrastructure, land use, water resources management, transportation and other policy and funding issues such that communities are motivated to act and informed about what to do to make them stronger and more resilient to the impacts of climate change.”

ND-GAIN

“ND-GAIN understands that cities are on the front lines of climate change adaptation. The model and indicators derived from this project will identify the greatest opportunities to improve resiliency for city dwellers,” said Jessica Hellmann, research director of ND-GAIN and associate professor at the University of Notre Dame.

ND-GAIN will use this work to scale to additional cities in the U.S. and around the world.

“Our partnership with Kresge will build a city adaptation indicator set and methodology and will initiate urban adaptation assessment in the U.S.,” said Joyce Coffee, managing director of ND-GAIN. “This project responds to the significant demand from city leaders and corporations for city-level measurement to inform decision-making that unlocks adaptation solutions.”

GAIN was founded in 2010 as the world’s first private sector-led, nonprofit organization created to save lives and livelihoods in developing countries by promoting adaptation solutions. It moved to the University of Notre Dame Environmental Change Initiative in 2013. ND-GAINproduces the world’s leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with changes brought about by resource constraints and climate disruption.

The Kresge Foundation seeks to help communities build resilience in the face of climate change. As a foundation committed to creating opportunity for low-income people and communities, Kresge is particularly concerned about the disproportionate effect climate change has on people with limited economic resources.

2014 ND-GAIN results show that Norway is most prepared for climate change

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Contact: Joyce Coffee, managing director, Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, 312-894-9028, jcoffee@nd.edu 

Norway is the best prepared country for climate change, and has been so for almost 20 years, according to data released Wednesday (Nov. 5) by the University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN). 
 
ND-GAIN is the world’s leading annual index that ranks more than 175 countries based on their vulnerability to climate change and their readiness to adapt to the droughts, superstorms and natural disasters that climate change can cause.
 
New Zealand, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Australia, the United Kingdom, United States, Germany and Iceland round out the top 10 countries most prepared for climate change.
 
In contrast, Afghanistan and several nations from sub-Saharan Africa such as Liberia, Sudan and Burundi have some of the lowest scores in the index.
 
The highest ranked countries share certain characteristics. Many do face moderate exposure to climate change, but they have good capacities to deal with the potential climate risks, including high access to amenities such as electricity, sanitation and clean drinking water. In general, they are also less dependent on natural capital, are better prepared for natural disasters and practice good governance.
 
“In Norway and the other members of the ND-GAIN leaderboard, we see role models in countries positioned to adapt to climate change,” Jessica Hellmann, research director of the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, said. “We also see a need for improvement. Not even the most developed countries are risk-free and completely prepared to deal with climate change.”
 
The 2014 ND-GAIN Index was compiled using a refined methodology, which incorporated new data. ND-GAIN officials note that adaptation is an evolving concept, and our understanding of climate change, and the risks it presents, is constantly improving with greater research and better data and models.
 
“This 2014 index captures the latest in vulnerability and readiness data and research,” Hellmann said. “ND-GAIN strives to bring the latest and most informative information to users so they can navigate a global landscape that is dramatically changing.”
 
The 2014 improved methodology and data sources have changed country rankings, as has the inclusion of recently released data. These changes reflect more complete data and a methodology that keeps pace with the latest knowledge on climate change. For instance, Russia moved up 45 places, China up 42, Seychelles up 35, Iraq up 33, Saudi Arabia up 30, Botswana up 28, South Korea up 27, Nepal up 26 and Zimbabwe up 25. Meanwhile, Swaziland (-25), Guatemala (-26), Mauritius (-29), El Salvador (-30), Jordan (-32), Belize (-39) and Romania (-39) have all declined in rank from 2013’s release to 2014’s.
 
The ND-GAIN Index remains more than just an annual ranking of countries. It is also an instrument that keeps track of the progress of nations over the last 18 years. As such, it contains crucial information for policymakers, the private sector and nonprofits. The index aims to unlock global adaptation solutions that save lives and improve livelihoods while strengthening market positions in the private sector and policy decisions in the public sector. It informs strategic, operational and reputational decisions regarding supply chains, capital projects and community engagements. The index is freely available to anyone with an Internet connection.
 
“ND-GAIN continues to be an open, transparent and actionable index, which has been conceived with the aid of open-source, state-of-the-art data and analysis tools,” said Nitesh Chawla, index director of the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index. “ND-GAIN also is preparing a scenario-analysis tool for users to conduct ‘what-if’ analyses and evaluate the impact of different possible action plans. This actionable nature of the index, and the tools we have, allows us to provide customized products to partners and other interested parties.”
 
The index was released on Wednesday (Nov. 5) at the 2014 Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index Annual Meeting hosted by the Wilson Center, a nonpartisan global public policy institution. The ND-GAIN annual meeting serves as the premier gathering of domestic and international experts on climate change adaptation and is attended by leading figures from the government, nonprofit and private sectors. Omega Overseas Investments is the meeting’s premier sponsor.
 
“In the lead-up to the Lima Climate Change Conference next month, and Paris’ Conference of the Parties in 2015, leaders are looking for solutions,” Joyce Coffee, managing director of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, said. “ND-GAIN provides data and analysis that enhance the world’s understanding of the importance of adaptation and inform public and private investments in vulnerable communities.”
 
ND-GAIN was founded in 2010 as the world’s first private sector-led, nonprofit organization created to save lives and livelihoods in developing countries by promoting adaptation solutions. ND-GAIN moved to Notre Dame from Washington, D.C., in April 2013. It is the world’s leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with the national security risks, droughts, superstorms and other natural disasters that climate change can cause. ND-GAIN is part of the University’s Environmental Change Initiative.
 

Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index honors unique climate-linked projects

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Contact: Joyce Coffee, managing director, ND-GAIN, 312-894-9028

In Senegal, efforts to counter the effects of rising sea levels and ocean storms have produced a dike that reclaims hundreds of acres of land for rice. A seawall protects homes, and beach restoration is saving thousands of tourist-related jobs. In India, Indonesia, Kenya and Vietnam, a unique social venture called “Healthy Family” helps address barriers to health care access such as the limited distribution of medicines.

These two separate and unique projects have won the University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index’s coveted 2014 Corporate Adaptation Prize. The annual award reflects contributions to awareness, science or action in creating resilience to climate change and applies to multinational and local corporations working on projects in countries ranked below 60 on the ND-GAIN climate adaptation index.

The 2014 winners, honored at a New York City event at Baker & McKenzie in connection with Climate Week NYC and the United Nations Climate Summit, are:

  • The Centre de Suivi Ecologique (CSE), based in Senegal, for its projects in three urban coastal areas with economic importance for fisheries and tourism and affected by coastal erosion. The project is a partnership between the Centre, the Senegalese government and Dynamique Femmes, among others, and is financed by the Adaptation Fund.
  • Novartis International AG for creating Social Ventures — shared-value business models that complement philanthropic and zero-profit initiatives — and its Healthy Family initiative that uses both social and business components working together to create sustainable solutions.

“ND-GAIN aims to enhance the world’s understanding of the importance of adaptation,” said Joyce Coffee, ND-GAIN’s managing director. “Given the impact droughts, fires, floods and superstorms will have on the bottom line, we encourage corporations of every size to consider opportunities to increase resiliency where they do business.”

Award recipients applauded the purpose of the annual competition. “We aim to improve global health. We’re honored that our work to improve health education and access in India has been recognized by ND-GAIN,” said Jürgen Brokatzky-Geiger, global head of corporate responsibility at Novartis. Mamadou Honadia, chair of the Adaptation Fund Board, said of the Centre project, “We’re working to increase resiliency along the coast, thereby improving livelihoods for thousands and enhancing the investment environment.” CSE’s Dethie S. Ndiaye noted, “Through the ND-GAIN prize, we show the world that local collaborations can help protect vulnerable populations.”

Submissions were received representing projects in more than 30 countries and more than 20 topics from forestry, water and food to energy and health. Submissions were evaluated on their measurable adaptation progress, scalability, market impact and partnerships.

The ND-Global Adaptation Index Corporate Adaptation Prize Winners demonstrate that scalable, corporate-driven climate adaptation is happening around the world and can inspire leaders from all sectors to galvanize initiatives that save lives and improve livelihoods in the face of global shifts.

Judges selecting the two 2014 Corporation Adaptation Prize winners were Stephen Cheney, retired brigadier general,USMC, and CEO of American Security Project; Loren Labovitch, emerging market growth and partnership director at MWH Global; Amy Luers, climate change director at Skoll Global Threats Fund; Jesus Madrazo, international corporate affairs lead at Monsanto Co.; Danielle Merfeld, global technology director at GE; Raj Rajan, RD&E vice president and global sustainability tech leader at Ecolab Inc.; and Carolyn Woo, chief executive officer and president of Catholic Relief Services.

Past winners of ND-GAIN CAP include Monsanto for its Water Efficient Maize for Africa Project in partnership with the Gates Foundation and USAID and PepsiCo for their i-crop “more crop per drop” precision agriculture technology in 2013. In 2012, the winners were Ushahidi for its Crowd Source Technology Platform, which helps communities communicate during crises; Positive Innovation for the Next Generation for its disease surveillance and mapping project in Botswana; and MEDA for its Technology Links for Improved Access and Incomes, which provides rural farming families access to agricultural technology.

GAIN was founded in 2010 as the world’s first private sector-led, nonprofit organization created to save lives and livelihoods in developing countries by promoting adaptation solutions. ND-GAIN moved to Notre Dame from Washington, D.C., in April 2013. It is the world’s leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with national security risks, droughts, superstorms and other natural disasters that climate change can cause. ND-GAIN is housed in the University’s Environmental Change Initiative.

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ND-GAIN seeking applications for Corporate Adaptation Prize

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Contact: Joyce Coffee, 574-807-9322, joyce.coffee.3@nd.edu 

The Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index(ND-GAIN) at the University of Notre Dame is accepting applications for the ND-GAIN Corporate Adaptation Prize, which recognizes organizations that have made measurable contributions in creating resilience or adaptation to climate change.

Award recipients must be either a multinational corporation or a local corporation working on a project in a country ranked below 60 on the ND-GAIN index and must include collaboration with local partners. Project applications will be judged on their measurable adaptation impact, scalability (relative within their category — multinational or local corporations) and market impact.

The judges for this year’s prize will include Stephen Cheney, retired brigadier general, USMC, and CEO of American Security Project; Amy Luers, climate change director, Skoll Global Threats Fund; Danielle Merfeld, global technology director, General Electric Corp.; Raj Rajan, RD&E vice president and global sustainability tech leader, Ecolab Inc.; and Carolyn Woo, chief executive officer and president of Catholic Relief Services.

The prize application is due Aug. 8 (Friday) and the winner(s) will be announced at Climate Week New York in September.

Applications can be submitted here.

ND-Global Adaptation Index is the world’s first nonprofit organization created to save lives and improve livelihoods in developing countries by promoting the understanding and importance of adapting to global changes brought about by climate, population shifts, urbanization and economic development. Its Country Index is the leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with security risks, droughts, superstorms and other disasters and is the only free and open-source index to measure a country’s vulnerability to climate change and other global forces, as well as its readiness to accept private and public sector investment in adaptation.

Decision-makers use ND-GAIN’s country-level rankings to determine how vulnerable countries are to global changes and how ready they are to adapt, thus informing strategic operational and reputational decisions regarding supply chains, policy choices, capital projects and community engagements. The index helps leaders avoid costs, manage liabilities and build resilience. ND-GAIN also informs market expansion by identifying which countries are ready for products and services that increase adaptation. Key elements of the metrics behind ND-GAIN include water, energy and transportation availability, along with economic, governance and human health factors. The index was created in consultation with world-class scientists, civil society representatives and business leaders.

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NDIGD and ND-GAIN awarded project from 3ie to design impact evaluation in Mozambique

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Contact: Joya Helmuth, NDIGD outreach associate, jhelmuth@nd.edu

 

The University of Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development (NDIGD) and the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) will work with faculty and staff from the Universidade Católica de Moçambique (UCM) to assess the impacts of early-warning systems for climate-related disasters in Mozambique.

Mozambique is densely populated and located in low-lying coastal and river zones, making it extremely susceptible to natural disasters and climate change including cyclones, storms and floods. Community-based disaster management committees (CLGRCs) and decentralized early-warning systems are being created to cope with climate risks. Notre Dame will help to evaluate the success of programs established by aid from the German government.

Funded by the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie), the research consortium composed of NDIGD, ND-GAIN and UCM experts will design a study to evaluate the impacts of CLGRCs and early-warning systems to show what and how interventions lead to increased climate resilience, and explore the degree of relevance and effectiveness of interventions across multiple sectors of the human and natural environment. The main focal zones of the project are Maputo and the Beira and Búzi districts.

University of Notre Dame Vice President of Research Robert Bernhard said, “NDIGD and ND-GAIN look forward to developing this new partnership with 3ie. This project extends Notre Dame’s faculty expertise to measure the impact of disaster risk management and climate change adaptation, implemented by Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit to enhance local resilience by building up early warning systems.”

Leading the research team from the University of Notre Dame is Jessica Hellmann, research director of ND-GAIN and associate professor in the department of biological sciences. NDIGD and ND-GAIN researchers collaborating on the project include Juan Carlos Guzman and Lila Khatiwada, monitoring and evaluation specialists with NDIGD, and Chen Chen, research fellow from ND-GAIN. UCM will provide support through lead researcher Dennis Eucker, research coordinator and senior lecturer.

Hellmann said, “We are excited to be part of helping communities adapt to climate change, something that is desperately needed around the world as sea level rises and storms, drought and heat waves become more intense.” Scientists, including a recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, explain that large-scale adaptation to climate change will be necessary in the coming decades. “But we do not yet know how to evaluate the effectiveness of adaptation actions. Our project will be among the first to develop adaptation assessment so that efforts to make Mozambique more resilient can be replicated around the world.”

NDIGD provides expertise in monitoring and evaluation through teaching and research faculty of the University and a dedicated staff of experienced researchers and administrators, integrated across multiple disciplines. ND-GAIN’s mission is to enhance the world’s understanding of the importance of adaptation and facilitate public and private investments in vulnerable communities. ND-GAIN prepares the world’s leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with global changes brought about by overcrowding, resource-constraints and climate disruption.

3ie’s vision is to improve lives through impact evaluation, by increasing development effectiveness in developing countries. 3ie’s strategy is to generate new evidence of what works, synthesize and disseminate this evidence, build a culture of evidence-based policy-making and develop capacity to produce and use impact evaluations.

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ND-GAIN seeking applications for Corporate Adaptation Prize

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Joyce Coffee, managing director, ND-GAIN, 574-807-9322, joyce.coffee.3@nd.edu 

 

ND-GAIN

The Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) at the University of Notre Dame is accepting applications for the ND-GAIN Corporate Adaptation Prize, which recognizes organizations that have made measurable contributions in creating resilience or adaptation to climate change.

Award recipients must be either a multinational corporation or a local corporation working on a project in a country ranked below 60 on the ND-GAIN index and must include collaboration with local partners. Project applications will be judged on their measurable adaptation impact, scalability (relative within their category — multinational or local corporations) and market impact.

The judges for this year’s prize will include retired Brig. Gen. Stephen Cheney, USMCCEO, American Security Project; Loren Labovitch, director of finance, investment and trade, Millennium Challenge Corporation; Amy Luers, climate change director, Skoll Global Threats Fund; Jesus Madrazo, International Corporate Affairs Lead, Monsanto Company; Danielle Merfeld, global technology director, GE; Raj Rajan, RD&E vice president and global sustainability tech leader, Ecolab Inc.; and Carolyn Woo, chief executive officer and president, Catholic Relief Services.

The prize application is due Aug. 8 and the winner(s) will be announced at Climate Week New York in September.

Applications can be submitted online here.

ND-Global Adaptation Index is the world’s first nonprofit organization created to save lives and improve livelihoods in developing countries by promoting the understanding and importance of adapting to global changes brought about by climate, population shifts, urbanization and economic development. Its Country Index is the leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with security risks, droughts, superstorms and other disasters. It is the only free and open-source index to measure a country’s vulnerability to climate change and other global forces, as well as its readiness to accept private and public sector investment in adaptation.

Decision-makers use ND-GAIN’s country-level rankings to determine how vulnerable countries are to global changes and how ready they are to adapt, thus informing strategic operational and reputational decisions regarding supply chains, policy choices, capital projects and community engagements. The index helps leaders avoid costs, manage liabilities and build resilience. ND-GAIN also informs market expansion by identifying which countries are ready for products and services that increase adaptation. Key elements of the metrics behind ND-GAIN include water, energy and transportation availability, along with economic, governance and human health factors. The index was created in consultation with world-class scientists, civil society representatives and business leaders.

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New ND-GAIN partnership addresses climate risk in supply chains

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Joyce Coffee, ND-GAIN, 312-894-9028, Joyce.Coffee.3@nd.edu

 

Climate indicators and country risk ratings developed by the University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) will be instrumental in a new partnership announced Tuesday (Feb. 25) whose goal is to develop the Climate Change Risk Management (CCRM) application. This application, which will enable large corporations to quickly map and quantify global supply chain risks due to climate change, leverages climate indicators and country risk ratings developed by ND-GAIN, the world’s leading research index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with climate disruption and other global shifts. Four Twenty Seven, a climate consultancy based in the San Francisco Bay area, has partnered with supply chain assessment experts from Climate Earth Inc. to develop the enterprise-quality application. The announcement was made at the Climate Leadership Conference in San Diego.

The 2014 World Economic Forum called climate change an “economically disruptive force,” and climate-related risks have risen on the agenda of global corporations in the past years. In Davos, Switzerland, in February, Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank, called on corporate leaders to take action: “Be the first mover. Use smart due diligence. … It’s simple self-interest. Every company, investor and bank that screens new and existing investments for climate risk is simply being pragmatic.” Business giants Coca-Cola Co. and Nike were recently featured in the New York Times as taking proactive measures to assess and prepare for climate-related disruptions in their supply chain.

This new CCRM application is the first in the industry to provide comprehensive mapping and modeling of climate change risk for every commodity across the entire supply chain. Typically implemented in 90 days or fewer, the CCRM application models all the goods and services that are hidden deep in a company’s supply chain and provides a quantitative assessment of the carbon, energy and water footprint associated with making its products and running its business. It also maps the country of origin from these goods and services, and provides users with an assessment of the exposure to the physical impacts of climate change.

“Companies need better tools to understand and act on climate risks. This application is a first foray into delivering climate intelligence to corporate leaders to support business resilience,” said Emilie Mazzacurati, managing director of Four Twenty Seven.

“We are delighted to be partnering with the expert consultants at Four Twenty Seven, and to have the opportunity to integrate ND-GAIN data into our core supply chain modeling system. Together we offer a powerful and innovative solution to help companies better understand and manage the rapidly growing risk of supply chain disruption due to climate change,” said Chris Erickson, a veteran Fortune 500 leader and president and CEO of Climate Earth.

“Corporate leaders are seeing more and more physical risks from climate change impacting their value chains,” said Joyce Coffee, managing director of the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index. “Embedding the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, a free and open source platform, in CCRM will help decision-makers better understand their future risks and opportunities, thereby unlocking corporate adaptation solutions that save lives and improve livelihoods while strengthening market positions.”

Four Twenty Seven LLC provides innovative tools and services to organizations seeking to understand climate impacts, assess risks to their operations or their stakeholders, and increase their resilience by developing and implementing climate adaptation measures.

Climate Earth’s Platform for Integrated Management provides a solution for systematically informing strategy and managing sustainable enterprise by linking an organization’s financial transaction data to environmental impact data in an enterprise-quality and scalable database.

Using 17 years of data, and measuring 50 variables, ND-GAIN ranks more than 175 countries annually based on how vulnerable they are to droughts, superstorms and other natural disasters and, uniquely, how ready they are to successfully implement adaptation solutions.

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New ND-GAIN partnership addresses climate risk in supply chains

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Joyce Coffee, ND-GAIN, 312-894-9028, Joyce.Coffee.3@nd.edu 

Climate indicators and country risk ratings developed by the University of Notre DameGlobal Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) will be instrumental in a new partnership announced Tuesday (Feb. 25) whose goal is to develop the Climate Change Risk Management (CCRM) application. This application, which will enable large corporations to quickly map and quantify global supply chain risks due to climate change, leverages climate indicators and country risk ratings developed by ND-GAIN, the world’s leading research index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with climate disruption and other global shifts. Four Twenty Seven, a climate consultancy based in the San Francisco Bay area, has partnered with supply chain assessment experts from Climate Earth Inc.to develop the enterprise-quality application. The announcement was made at the Climate Leadership Conference in San Diego.

The 2014 World Economic Forum called climate change an “economically disruptive force,” and climate-related risks have risen on the agenda of global corporations in the past years. In Davos, Switzerland, in February, Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank, called on corporate leaders to take action: “Be the first mover. Use smart due diligence. … It’s simple self-interest. Every company, investor and bank that screens new and existing investments for climate risk is simply being pragmatic.” Business giants Coca-Cola Co. and Nike were recently featured in the New York Times as taking proactive measures to assess and prepare for climate-related disruptions in their supply chain.

This new CCRM application is the first in the industry to provide comprehensive mapping and modeling of climate change risk for every commodity across the entire supply chain. Typically implemented in 90 days or fewer, the CCRM application models all the goods and services that are hidden deep in a company’s supply chain and provides a quantitative assessment of the carbon, energy and water footprint associated with making its products and running its business. It also maps the country of origin from these goods and services, and provides users with an assessment of the exposure to the physical impacts of climate change.

“Companies need better tools to understand and act on climate risks. This application is a first foray into delivering climate intelligence to corporate leaders to support business resilience,” said Emilie Mazzacurati, managing director of Four Twenty Seven.

“We are delighted to be partnering with the expert consultants at Four Twenty Seven, and to have the opportunity to integrate ND-GAIN data into our core supply chain modeling system. Together we offer a powerful and innovative solution to help companies better understand and manage the rapidly growing risk of supply chain disruption due to climate change,” said Chris Erickson, a veteran Fortune 500 leader and president and CEO of Climate Earth.

“Corporate leaders are seeing more and more physical risks from climate change impacting their value chains,” said Joyce Coffee, managing director of the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index. “Embedding the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index, a free and open source platform, in CCRM will help decision-makers better understand their future risks and opportunities, thereby unlocking corporate adaptation solutions that save lives and improve livelihoods while strengthening market positions.”

Four Twenty Seven LLC provides innovative tools and services to organizations seeking to understand climate impacts, assess risks to their operations or their stakeholders, and increase their resilience by developing and implementing climate adaptation measures.

Climate Earth’s Platform for Integrated Management provides a solution for systematically informing strategy and managing sustainable enterprise by linking an organization’s financial transaction data to environmental impact data in an enterprise-quality and scalable database.

Using 17 years of data, and measuring 50 variables, ND-GAIN ranks more than 175 countries annually based on how vulnerable they are to droughts, superstorms and other natural disasters and, uniquely, how ready they are to successfully implement adaptation solutions.

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2013 ND-GAIN data show world’s poorest countries lag 100 years behind richest in preparing for climate change

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Contact: Joyce Coffee, ND-GAIN Managing Director, (574) 807-9322, jcoffee@nd.edu 

 

ND-GAIN 2013 report

It will take the world’s poorest countries more than one century just to reach the level of climate change readiness that the richest countries already enjoy, according to data released Thursday (Dec. 12) by the 2013 University of Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN).

ND-GAIN is the world’s leading annual index that ranks more than 175 countries based on their vulnerability to climate change and their readiness to adapt to the droughts, superstorms and natural disasters that climate change can cause.

The latest version of Notre Dame’s annual index highlights huge disparities between the developed world and developing world when it comes to being prepared for the problems climate change is expected to cause in this century.

“We knew that there were disparities between the richest and poorest countries when it comes to climate change adaptation and readiness,” said Associate Professor Jessica Hellmann, who leads Notre Dame’s climate change adaptation program. “But we did not realize that it would take more than 100 years for the poorest countries just to reach the readiness levels that the richest countries have already attained.”

ND-GAIN

Some examples of the countries on this 100-year trajectory include Cambodia, Kenya and Haiti. “Given the recent typhoon in the Philippines, some people may be wondering where that island nation falls in terms of readiness,” said Associate Professor Nitesh Chawla, director of the Notre DameInterdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications. “According to the data, the Philippines are more than 40 years behind the most developed countries in climate readiness. While that’s better than the poorest countries, it shows that the Philippines still has a long way to go.”

While the ND-GAIN Index shows that countries around the world are becoming more resilient in the face of climate change, the data also show that this trend is not happening nearly fast enough — even for developed countries. “These data are sobering because they cast light on just how unprepared some of the most vulnerable nations really are,” Hellmann said. “But they also show that the most developed countries are not doing enough either, which raises serious public policy questions no matter how well-developed a national economy may be.”

This year’s data show that the ND-GAIN Index is more than just a ranking of countries. The index, which is “open source” and available to anyone with an Internet connection, contains crucial information for policymakers, the private sector and nonprofits. The index aims to unlock global adaptation solutions that save lives and improve livelihoods while strengthening market positions in the private sector and policy decisions in the public sector. It informs strategic, operational and reputational decisions regarding supply chains, capital projects and community engagements. “This year’s announcement shows that the index contains data that can clearly help decision-makers determine global, regional and national priorities,” Chawla said.

Under the United Nations-led climate talks, billions of dollars have been pledged to help the world adapt to climate change. But key questions remain on where and how that money should be spent. ND-GAIN is one tool that can help governments, nongovernmental organizations and the private sector better target those and other investments.

The 2013 Index was released on Thursday (Dec. 12) at the ND-GAIN Annual Meeting hosted by the Wilson Center, a nonpartisan global public policy institution. The ND-GAIN Annual Meeting serves as the premier gathering of domestic and international experts on climate change adaptation and is attended by leading figures from the government, nonprofit and private sectors.

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Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index recognizes PepsiCo and Monsanto for climate adaptation strategies

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Contact: Joyce Coffee, ND-GAIN Managing Director, (574) 807-9322, jcoffee@nd.edu 

Washington, DC – Today the University of Notre Dame’s Global Adaptation Index (ND-GAIN) announced that PepsiCo and Monsanto are the 2013 winners of its ND-GAIN Corporate Adaptation Award, an annual award for contributions to awareness, science or action in creating resilience to climate change.
           
This year, the prize was awarded to two multinational corporations working with local partners to decrease climate-related vulnerability and improve readiness. The winning corporate project also had to have a measurable impact in a country ranked below 60 on the ND-GAIN Index and be focused on such areas as food security, water access, coastal protection, ecosystem services, human habitats, human health or other climate-related vulnerability.

PepsiCo was recognized for its overall approach to precision agriculture in India. In collaboration with the Columbia Water Center of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, and supported by a grant from the PepsiCo Foundation, the company has worked with rice farmers in India, deploying water measurement, seeding and disease management technologies that allow farmers to conserve 20 percent more water than traditional flood irrigation. 
           
“As a global food and beverage company, agriculture is crucial to PepsiCo’s business and to the growers and communities where we operate. To improve the resilience of our supply chains across the world we need sound, scientific data, and tools like the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Index are critically important in researching a country’s vulnerability to global climate risks. We are pleased to accept the ND-GAIN Corporate Adaptation Award for our approach to precision agriculture,” noted Dan Bena, senior director of sustainable development, PepsiCo.

Monsanto and its partners in WEMA (Water Efficient Maize for Africa) were recognized for an agricultural sector food and water vulnerability project in Kenya. WEMA is a public/private partnership with the objective to improve food security and rural livelihood among smallholder farmers and their families in Sub-Saharan Africa by developing and deploying new drought-tolerant and insect pest-protected maize varieties. The partnership project is led by the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF) and it is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Howard G. Buffett Foundation and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). In addition to Monsanto, other WEMA partners include the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) and five National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and South Africa. WEMA is in its sixth year and the first conventional maize

hybrid coming out of the partnership is currently being distributed to smallholder farmers in Kenya for planting.

“Monsanto is honored to accept this Corporate Adaptation Award on behalf of the WEMA partnership,” said Jesus Madrazo, vice president of corporate affairs for Monsanto. “We are proud of the work the partnership has done to help adapt to climate change. We also are grateful for ND-GAIN’s tremendous efforts to highlight the important role climate adaptation will play in saving lives and improving livelihoods.”

GAIN was founded in 2010 as the world’s first private sector-led, nonprofit organization designed to promote adaptation solutions in developing countries and around the world. ND-GAIN moved to Notre Dame from Washington, D.C. in April of this year. It is the world’s leading index showing which countries are best prepared to deal with the national security risks, droughts, superstorms and other natural disasters that climate change can cause. ND-GAIN is housed in the University’s Environmental Change Initiative (ECI).

The awards were announced in Washington, D.C. during ND-GAIN’s Annual Meetingsponsored by the Wilson Center, a nonpartisan global public policy institution. The ND-GAIN Annual Meeting serves as the premier gathering of domestic and international experts on climate change adaptation and is attended by leading figures from the government, nonprofit and private sectors.

 

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